Friday, November 14, 2014

What Would You Do With Unexpected Success?

Success is a force you must learn to control, like a superpower. When you do something well, it shows, no matter what. And when you do that thing well, people keep wanting you to do it. If they want it badly enough, and you feel like making a profit, you can charge them money for it. Then you're set for life.

You can branch off from the initial success (say, teaching) and write books about it, create websites around it, become a mentor to others who are pursuing it. The sky's the limit, really. But what if that thing you're so good at isn't really what you want to do?

If you become famous or wealthy enough doing that first thing, you've gotten yourself a wonderful platform and hefty bank account to support anything else you want to do. It helps your admirers if that new thing ties into what you became so famous for, but the two don't have to be associated.

What would you do if you became successful in something you hadn't intended to pursue? Would you keep doing it just to make money, or would you follow another path?

Here's another question. If what you wanted to do most was a struggle, and your successes came from something you didn't have to try for, which would you choose?

3 comments:

  1. Does it have to be an either/or issue? ... I'd organise it so the 'didn't have to try for' thing supported the 'thing I wanted to do most.'


    Best of both worlds. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Not at all, Widder. I was just approaching it from the angle that the 'didn't have to try for' thing wasn't closely related. But, given most people's talent pool, a lot of things are probably related. I think yours is a great idea (one I'm actually trying to do myself). Thanks for the comment! ^_^

    ReplyDelete
  3. Interesting question. I feel like you're describing my life. I didn't plan to get into journalism OR communications--they were just meant to pay the bills while I worked on the dream of becoming a full-time novelist.


    But those careers took off unexpectedly, often hindering my real-life goals. I wasn't able to make time for my writing fiction a lot of the time. In the communications field, I kept climbing the ladder. I was a director making close to six figures when I decided to go back to freelancing part-time and trying to make the novel writing dream happen. It was hard to give up the security and the salary, but my happiness, health, and wellbeing are so much more important. If anything, I wish I'd walked away sooner.

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear what you have to say!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...